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Dear Moms of Teenagers You Are Not Alone

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Are you a lonely Mom or Dad of a teenager?

If you answered yes, then I am here to tell you dear moms of teenagers you are not alone.

I recently read a blog post that a friend shared on Facebook titled, “Dear Lonely Mom of Older Kids” and it really got me thinking. 

The article talked about many of the things that make up the roller coaster ride of being a teenager. I am talking about braces, acne, not making a team, changes in friendships, driving a car for the first time, broken hearts, and so much more.

The article spoke about the different types of chaos that comes with having a teen. The author said that there isn’t a lot of cute in the teenage type of chaos. 

One of the main points of the post was that parenting during the teenage years can often be a lonely time because a lot of it you can’t talk about, because your kid would be mad that you overshared.

The author also mentioned that the online world seems to go quiet for the moms of pre-teens, teenagers and young adults. 

Here is where I see things differently.

The online world, now that I am a mother of a teenager, has come alive in a different way. 

I say, no actually I am shouting, that Mom and Dads you CAN and SHOULD feel free to share all about your teen.

Just because you may now be parenting a child that is not taking cute first wobbly steps, smiling at you with a toothless grin, babbling first words, trying multiple times to hit the ball off the tee or heading off to school for the very first time, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t share.

In fact parents of teens should share even more, as the changes that both you and your child might be going through during this phase of life could possibly help another parent feel like they aren’t alone. 

Very recently over social media I saw parents of teens posting about their young adults starting at a new school, junior high school pictures, about their teen making an elite sports team, the fact that their teen doesn’t clean up their room, a teenager who will be getting their braces off shortly, the trials and tribulations of the teenage attitude, a teen who isn’t in a rush to grow up, the celebration of a firstborn turning into a teenager, a teenage boy who was disappointed after losing a game and so much more.

Please know that as the mom of a teenager I love, soak up and try to engage with each and every one of these types of social shares from fellow parents of teens.

I appreciate and hope that you continue to share your lives, stories, families, and more with the world, because watching your child grow and transform into a young adult is still cute, just a different phase of cute. 

Hear me when I  say that I see and find the cute in your chaos, teenage chaos. 

Now don’t get me wrong, a part of me will always crave the days when my sweet son used to cry if I wasn’t in the same room with him, but there is also a part of me that smiles and quietly cheers along the sidelines of life while watching him spread his wings and do his own thing. 

Dear Moms of Teenagers You Are Not Alone

Leaning against the Kia, my son was feeling a bit defeated after losing a basketball game.

Dear Moms of Teenagers You Are Not Alone

My teen always runs his heart out at his cross county meets.

Dear Moms of Teenagers You Are Not Alone

Doing homework with Dad. Co-parenting at its finest.

Dear Moms of Teenagers You Are Not Alone

One of my son’s best qualities is that he always lives his best life no matter what others think.

Dear moms of teenagers you are not alone.

Parents of teenagers, if at any moment you feel lonely please know that I am here and want to listen, watch, learn and support you as you navigate your way through this unchartered parenting territory.  

During any moments of loneliness know that you can always count on me to continue to share my teenage parenting journey, because I think it is a beautiful chapter of life that deserves the spotlight too.

x,

Clarissa

 

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elizabeth miller

Wednesday 17th of January 2018

I am a mother of 4, ages 30,27,26, and 12. I have to say the teenage years is the most transitional years for kids. I have been lucky enough to be very close to all of mine through those years but have been fussed at for oversharing lol. No matter how hard you try though you do almost get an empty nest feeling sometimes....especially when you see you baby starting it.

Anagha Yatin

Monday 16th of October 2017

Dear Clarissa, I agree with you. Being a mother to a 15 yrs old Son, I have also grown with many of boy things! And my teacher was none other than my son. It could take place because, we share an open relationship. We share a lot of things. Its rather fun to re-live those teenager days from a mature perspective! Engaging read! Anagha has recently postedIts All About Money Honey

Clarissa

Monday 16th of October 2017

Thank you so much for your comment and being able to relate.

sunphant

Saturday 14th of October 2017

I'm so glad these days are over for me, but it doesn't end when they first get out of college. Now I'm dealing with the defeat of not getting the job they wanted and student loan payments. Motherhood never ends.

Clarissa

Saturday 14th of October 2017

You are so right, Motherhood never ends, no matter how old they get.

Gina Butler

Friday 13th of October 2017

As always great post! I think it's a lot easier to share things when our children are tiny. There are firsts that need to be acknowledged and celebrated just like first steps, first teeth etc.

Parenting can be lonely for sure. I agree with you that we need to be there for each other in every aspect of parenting.

The phrase "it takes a village to raise a child" is very true. I personally am an empty nester but I love to read stories about everyone else's children.

Clarissa

Saturday 14th of October 2017

Thank you for reading! You are right that it definitely takes a village to raise a child.